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Keynote Lectures

CLOUD, Trigger of a Socio-economic Revolution
Tobias Hoellwarth, EuroCloud Europe, Austria

To be announced
Péter Kacsuk, MTA SZTAKI, Hungary

Will Cloud gain an Edge?
Lee Gillam, University of Surrey, United Kingdom

 

CLOUD, Trigger of a Socio-economic Revolution

Tobias Hoellwarth
EuroCloud Europe
Austria
 

Brief Bio
Dr. Höllwarth has worked as a corporate consultant specialized in IT projects for over 20 years. In addition to his work at the Vienna University of Economics and Business he also founded the companies Höllwarth Consulting, ICT Advisory Network and Sourcing International. Dr. Tobias Höllwarth was a founding member of EuroCloud Austria where he is today a member of the Board and is the director for the international StarAudit program and president of EuroCloud Europe. He acts as an expert for questions pertaining to certification at the Austrian Standards Institute and is leader of the Austrian delegation that participates in negotiations with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) where cloud computing is concerned.


Abstract
A presentation that will point out the similarities of the previous socio-economic revolutions that changed human live and explain the positive and the disastrous economic consequences that have become visible already. It will focus as well in the Europe society that is not yet prepared well for this massive change. Why is this and how one can participate actively in this game to help providers and the customer to add some learnings.;



 

 

Keynote Lecture

Péter Kacsuk
MTA SZTAKI
Hungary
 

Brief Bio
Professor Peter Kacsuk is the Head of the Research Laboratory of the Parallel and Distributed Systems. He received his MSc and university doctorate degrees from the Technical University of Budapest in 1976 and 1984, respectively. He received the kandidat degree from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in 1989. He habilitated at the University of Vienna in 1997. He recieved his professor title from the Hungarian President in 1999 and the Doctor of Academy degree (DSc) from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in 2001. He has been a part-time full professor at the Cavendish School of Computer Science of the University of Westminster in London and at the Eötvös Lóránd University of Science in Budapest since 2001. He served as visiting scientist or professor several times at various universities of Austria, England, Germany, Spain, Australia and Japan. He has published two books, two lecture notes and more than 200 scientific papers on parallel computer architectures, parallel software engineering and Grid computing. He is co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Grid Computing published by Springer.


Abstract
Available Soon.



 

 

Will Cloud gain an Edge?

Lee Gillam
University of Surrey
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Dr Lee Gillam is a Senior Lecturer and Director of Learning and Teaching in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Surrey, and Chartered IT Professional Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS CITP). He is founding Editor-in-Chief of the Springer Journal of Cloud Computing Advances, Systems and Applications (JoCCASA), an editor of a Springer book on Cloud Computing now in its 2nd edition, and a co-author of two reports for EPSRC/JISC on Cloud Computing (Research Use Cases, and Costs). His research has addressed Cloud Computing, Grid Computing, Information Retrieval, Information Extraction and Ontology Learning, with current activities addressing topics including Connected and Autonomous Vehicles in respect to Mobile Edge Cloud over 5G networks, Data Leak/Loss Prevention, Privacy Preserving Data Analysis, Cloud Service Brokerage, Energy Efficient Performance in Data Centres, and Cloud Forensics. This research has created resulted in both patents and companies, with one of the companies formed receiving an award for the UK's Most Innovative Small Cyber Security Company at Infosecurity Europe 2015.


Abstract
Cloud has tended to be characterised by large-scale data centre provision, with economic advantages as come with ease of centralized provision at relatively few locations. This has allowed for, amongst other advantages, ease of dynamic usage scaling, uptake of increasingly diverse capabilities, and use of significant storage capacity. However, such provisions have tended to be at some distance from specific needs, proving problematic where responsiveness is critical, and this offers motivation for reappraisal of more proximate provisions. Consequently, notions such as Multi-access Edge Computing (MEC), are becoming attractive, particularly when given close relationship to future telecommunications capabilities as promised by 5G. This talk will discuss the extension of Cloud capabilities to Edge, identifying some of the continued and upcoming challenges to address when creating systems able to exploit architectures involving either, or both, of these.



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